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ITALIA- LA SIMBIOSIS MUTUALISTA ENTRE UN ÁCARO PARÁSITO Y UN VIRUS PATOGENICO SOCAVA LA SALUD E INMUNIDAD DE LAS ABEJAS MELLIFERAS

Miércoles 17 de Febrero de 2016 14:37 por Analia Manriquez

Documento elaborado por  Gennaro Di Priscoa, Desiderato Annoscia, Marina Margiotta, Rosalba Ferrara, Paola Varricchio, Virginia Zanni, Emilio Caprio, Francesco Nazzi y Francesco Pennacchio. Por favor descargue el documento adjunto

 

 

 

Significance

The parasitic mite Varroa destructor and the deformed wing virus (DWV) are linked in a mutualistic symbiosis. The mite acts as vector of the viral pathogen, whereas the DWV-induced immunosuppression in honey bees favors mite feeding and reproduction. This functional interaction underpins a rapidly escalating immunosuppression, which can be primed and/or aggravated by a wealth of stress factors that co-trigger colony losses. Our experimental results explain the pivotal role proposed for the Varroa–DWV association in the induction of honey bee colony losses. Here we provide a functional framework for studying the dynamics of this multifactorial syndrome and defining effective strategies to reduce its negative impact on the beekeeping industry.

 

 

Abstract

Honey bee colony losses are triggered by interacting stress factors consistently associated with high loads of parasites and/or pathogens. A wealth of biotic and abiotic stressors are involved in the induction of this complex multifactorial syndrome, with the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and the associated deformed wing virus (DWV) apparently playing key roles. The mechanistic basis underpinning this association and the evolutionary implications remain largely obscure. Here we narrow this research gap by demonstrating that DWV, vectored by the Varroa mite, adversely affects humoral and cellular immune responses by interfering with NF-κB signaling. This immunosuppressive effect of the viral pathogen enhances reproduction of the parasitic mite. Our experimental data uncover an unrecognized mutualistic symbiosis between Varroa and DWV, which perpetuates a loop of reciprocal stimulation with escalating negative effects on honey bee immunity and health. These results largely account for the remarkable importance of this mite–virus interaction in the induction of honey bee colony losses. The discovery of this mutualistic association and the elucidation of the underlying regulatory mechanisms sets the stage for a more insightful analysis of how synergistic stress factors contribute to colony collapse, and for the development of new strategies to alleviate this problem.

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